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Germany Striker Banned for Two Games for Reasons Including His Love for Nutella

Germany Striker Banned for Two Games for Reasons Including His Love for Nutella

Wolfsburg striker Max Kruse was outed for his Nutella addiction

Germany manager Joachim Low says, “We need players who are focused on football.”

Wolfsburg striker Max Kruse has put his career in jeopardy over some recent inappropriate actions…and his love for Nutella.

Klaus Allofs, the director of the team, spoke with Kruse about his diet during winter training last week, reports The Washington Post.

“The aim is to support our players to deliver optimum performance,” Allofs said. “Max needs to correct a few things.” Perhaps one of the things Allofs is referring to is Kruse’s habit of eating Nutella as part of his breakfast, according to The Daily Mail.

Eating habits aside, other recent incidents have landed Kruse in hot water with his team. Kruse left €75,000 ($84,000 USD) in a taxi cab after a night of playing poker. The money was never recovered.

In another incident, Kruse reportedly grabbed a cell phone from a woman taking photos of him in a Berlin nightclub. Though he apologized, he was fined €25,000 ($28,000 USD).

Germany Manager Joachim Low says, “We need players who are focused on football and also understand their role as role models. I talked with Max about what I expect from players on and off the pitch. His actions in the last weeks were unprofessional.”


Which players have attacked fans?

Nottingham Forest manager Brian Clough (white collar), grabs a football supporter, one of hundreds who swarmed onto the field after Forest's 5-2 victory over Queens Park Rangers in a Littlewoods Cup quarter-final. One Forest supporter told the Press Association that she saw Clough hit at least four people. Photograph: PA/PA Archive/Press Association Ima

Nottingham Forest manager Brian Clough (white collar), grabs a football supporter, one of hundreds who swarmed onto the field after Forest's 5-2 victory over Queens Park Rangers in a Littlewoods Cup quarter-final. One Forest supporter told the Press Association that she saw Clough hit at least four people. Photograph: PA/PA Archive/Press Association Ima

"I noticed in this weekend's Observer that a Colombian player was sent to prison earlier this year after shooting a fan," wrote Ed McMillan last week. "Other than the obvious Cantona kung-fu kick, are there many other example of players attacking supporters, particularly their own?"

Eric Cantona is by no means alone in his aggressive attitude toward supporters. Javier Flórez was the Colombian midfielder who went too far after losing in a local tournament final earlier this year. The Atletico Junior player shot at a group of supporters, killing one, who chanted "weak, weak, weak" at him as he drove past. Flórez explained he was "drunk and angry" when it happened, following his release from prison on a £45,000 bail.

Somewhat less tragically, Paul Haynes recounts the story of Tom "Pongo" Waring, an Aston Villa striker (in more ways than one) in the 1930s. "The story goes while playing for Aston Villa in a match at Villa Park, Waring had gone to fetch the ball that had gone out of play," he writes. "He then heard someone making an insulting remark, waded into a crowd, punched the offender and then received a round of applause when he returned to the pitch. He was neither sanctioned, sent off, punished by his club/the FA nor was he charged by the police, and remains a legend with Aston Villa supporters to this day."

Adam Fleet suggests Gerry Armstrong who "left Brighton under something of a cloud, having clambered into the stands during a reserve game and headbutting a fan for making disparaging remarks". Indeed the former Northern Ireland international was charged with GBH after the incident — following the first red card of Armstrong's career – during a Sussex Cup tie in January 1988 that left the spectator, Wayne Marmont, requiring six stitches in a gashed forehead. Armstrong left the club a fortnight later, and after a court appearance was conditionally discharged for a year and ordered to pay £200 compensation and £20 costs.

In March 1994 there was a riotous end to Fisher Athletic's game against Wealdstone, with Fisher's David Ward running the width of the pitch, wading into the crowd and punching a fan who had been barracking him on the side of the head. An FA disciplinary hearing dished out a two-week ban.

Manchester City's Craig Bellamy added his name to this roster of shame on Sunday, after appearing to shove a fan who had run on to the Old Trafford pitch following Michael Owen's late winner for Manchester United and as Mark Hughes (and reader Henry Young) point out Brian Clough cuffed a pitch invader while manager of Nottingham Forest and received a touchline ban for his trouble

Major League Soccer supporters also seem in inflame players' ire. David Beckham confronted Los Angeles Galaxy fans earlier this year, and Clint Mathis was fined $500 for something similar in 2003, though neither could be construed as an outright attack. Unlike the incident in 2001 when Tampa Bay's Mamadou Diallo, MLS's top goalscorer in 2000, lunged toward and threw a punch at a Colorado Rapids fan as he walked off the pitch at full-time following a 2-1 defeat. The Rapids fan, who Diallo accused of racial abuse, apparently held off the attacker with the help of an umbrella and the Senegalese was handed a four-game suspension.


Which players have attacked fans?

Nottingham Forest manager Brian Clough (white collar), grabs a football supporter, one of hundreds who swarmed onto the field after Forest's 5-2 victory over Queens Park Rangers in a Littlewoods Cup quarter-final. One Forest supporter told the Press Association that she saw Clough hit at least four people. Photograph: PA/PA Archive/Press Association Ima

Nottingham Forest manager Brian Clough (white collar), grabs a football supporter, one of hundreds who swarmed onto the field after Forest's 5-2 victory over Queens Park Rangers in a Littlewoods Cup quarter-final. One Forest supporter told the Press Association that she saw Clough hit at least four people. Photograph: PA/PA Archive/Press Association Ima

"I noticed in this weekend's Observer that a Colombian player was sent to prison earlier this year after shooting a fan," wrote Ed McMillan last week. "Other than the obvious Cantona kung-fu kick, are there many other example of players attacking supporters, particularly their own?"

Eric Cantona is by no means alone in his aggressive attitude toward supporters. Javier Flórez was the Colombian midfielder who went too far after losing in a local tournament final earlier this year. The Atletico Junior player shot at a group of supporters, killing one, who chanted "weak, weak, weak" at him as he drove past. Flórez explained he was "drunk and angry" when it happened, following his release from prison on a £45,000 bail.

Somewhat less tragically, Paul Haynes recounts the story of Tom "Pongo" Waring, an Aston Villa striker (in more ways than one) in the 1930s. "The story goes while playing for Aston Villa in a match at Villa Park, Waring had gone to fetch the ball that had gone out of play," he writes. "He then heard someone making an insulting remark, waded into a crowd, punched the offender and then received a round of applause when he returned to the pitch. He was neither sanctioned, sent off, punished by his club/the FA nor was he charged by the police, and remains a legend with Aston Villa supporters to this day."

Adam Fleet suggests Gerry Armstrong who "left Brighton under something of a cloud, having clambered into the stands during a reserve game and headbutting a fan for making disparaging remarks". Indeed the former Northern Ireland international was charged with GBH after the incident — following the first red card of Armstrong's career – during a Sussex Cup tie in January 1988 that left the spectator, Wayne Marmont, requiring six stitches in a gashed forehead. Armstrong left the club a fortnight later, and after a court appearance was conditionally discharged for a year and ordered to pay £200 compensation and £20 costs.

In March 1994 there was a riotous end to Fisher Athletic's game against Wealdstone, with Fisher's David Ward running the width of the pitch, wading into the crowd and punching a fan who had been barracking him on the side of the head. An FA disciplinary hearing dished out a two-week ban.

Manchester City's Craig Bellamy added his name to this roster of shame on Sunday, after appearing to shove a fan who had run on to the Old Trafford pitch following Michael Owen's late winner for Manchester United and as Mark Hughes (and reader Henry Young) point out Brian Clough cuffed a pitch invader while manager of Nottingham Forest and received a touchline ban for his trouble

Major League Soccer supporters also seem in inflame players' ire. David Beckham confronted Los Angeles Galaxy fans earlier this year, and Clint Mathis was fined $500 for something similar in 2003, though neither could be construed as an outright attack. Unlike the incident in 2001 when Tampa Bay's Mamadou Diallo, MLS's top goalscorer in 2000, lunged toward and threw a punch at a Colorado Rapids fan as he walked off the pitch at full-time following a 2-1 defeat. The Rapids fan, who Diallo accused of racial abuse, apparently held off the attacker with the help of an umbrella and the Senegalese was handed a four-game suspension.


Which players have attacked fans?

Nottingham Forest manager Brian Clough (white collar), grabs a football supporter, one of hundreds who swarmed onto the field after Forest's 5-2 victory over Queens Park Rangers in a Littlewoods Cup quarter-final. One Forest supporter told the Press Association that she saw Clough hit at least four people. Photograph: PA/PA Archive/Press Association Ima

Nottingham Forest manager Brian Clough (white collar), grabs a football supporter, one of hundreds who swarmed onto the field after Forest's 5-2 victory over Queens Park Rangers in a Littlewoods Cup quarter-final. One Forest supporter told the Press Association that she saw Clough hit at least four people. Photograph: PA/PA Archive/Press Association Ima

"I noticed in this weekend's Observer that a Colombian player was sent to prison earlier this year after shooting a fan," wrote Ed McMillan last week. "Other than the obvious Cantona kung-fu kick, are there many other example of players attacking supporters, particularly their own?"

Eric Cantona is by no means alone in his aggressive attitude toward supporters. Javier Flórez was the Colombian midfielder who went too far after losing in a local tournament final earlier this year. The Atletico Junior player shot at a group of supporters, killing one, who chanted "weak, weak, weak" at him as he drove past. Flórez explained he was "drunk and angry" when it happened, following his release from prison on a £45,000 bail.

Somewhat less tragically, Paul Haynes recounts the story of Tom "Pongo" Waring, an Aston Villa striker (in more ways than one) in the 1930s. "The story goes while playing for Aston Villa in a match at Villa Park, Waring had gone to fetch the ball that had gone out of play," he writes. "He then heard someone making an insulting remark, waded into a crowd, punched the offender and then received a round of applause when he returned to the pitch. He was neither sanctioned, sent off, punished by his club/the FA nor was he charged by the police, and remains a legend with Aston Villa supporters to this day."

Adam Fleet suggests Gerry Armstrong who "left Brighton under something of a cloud, having clambered into the stands during a reserve game and headbutting a fan for making disparaging remarks". Indeed the former Northern Ireland international was charged with GBH after the incident — following the first red card of Armstrong's career – during a Sussex Cup tie in January 1988 that left the spectator, Wayne Marmont, requiring six stitches in a gashed forehead. Armstrong left the club a fortnight later, and after a court appearance was conditionally discharged for a year and ordered to pay £200 compensation and £20 costs.

In March 1994 there was a riotous end to Fisher Athletic's game against Wealdstone, with Fisher's David Ward running the width of the pitch, wading into the crowd and punching a fan who had been barracking him on the side of the head. An FA disciplinary hearing dished out a two-week ban.

Manchester City's Craig Bellamy added his name to this roster of shame on Sunday, after appearing to shove a fan who had run on to the Old Trafford pitch following Michael Owen's late winner for Manchester United and as Mark Hughes (and reader Henry Young) point out Brian Clough cuffed a pitch invader while manager of Nottingham Forest and received a touchline ban for his trouble

Major League Soccer supporters also seem in inflame players' ire. David Beckham confronted Los Angeles Galaxy fans earlier this year, and Clint Mathis was fined $500 for something similar in 2003, though neither could be construed as an outright attack. Unlike the incident in 2001 when Tampa Bay's Mamadou Diallo, MLS's top goalscorer in 2000, lunged toward and threw a punch at a Colorado Rapids fan as he walked off the pitch at full-time following a 2-1 defeat. The Rapids fan, who Diallo accused of racial abuse, apparently held off the attacker with the help of an umbrella and the Senegalese was handed a four-game suspension.


Which players have attacked fans?

Nottingham Forest manager Brian Clough (white collar), grabs a football supporter, one of hundreds who swarmed onto the field after Forest's 5-2 victory over Queens Park Rangers in a Littlewoods Cup quarter-final. One Forest supporter told the Press Association that she saw Clough hit at least four people. Photograph: PA/PA Archive/Press Association Ima

Nottingham Forest manager Brian Clough (white collar), grabs a football supporter, one of hundreds who swarmed onto the field after Forest's 5-2 victory over Queens Park Rangers in a Littlewoods Cup quarter-final. One Forest supporter told the Press Association that she saw Clough hit at least four people. Photograph: PA/PA Archive/Press Association Ima

"I noticed in this weekend's Observer that a Colombian player was sent to prison earlier this year after shooting a fan," wrote Ed McMillan last week. "Other than the obvious Cantona kung-fu kick, are there many other example of players attacking supporters, particularly their own?"

Eric Cantona is by no means alone in his aggressive attitude toward supporters. Javier Flórez was the Colombian midfielder who went too far after losing in a local tournament final earlier this year. The Atletico Junior player shot at a group of supporters, killing one, who chanted "weak, weak, weak" at him as he drove past. Flórez explained he was "drunk and angry" when it happened, following his release from prison on a £45,000 bail.

Somewhat less tragically, Paul Haynes recounts the story of Tom "Pongo" Waring, an Aston Villa striker (in more ways than one) in the 1930s. "The story goes while playing for Aston Villa in a match at Villa Park, Waring had gone to fetch the ball that had gone out of play," he writes. "He then heard someone making an insulting remark, waded into a crowd, punched the offender and then received a round of applause when he returned to the pitch. He was neither sanctioned, sent off, punished by his club/the FA nor was he charged by the police, and remains a legend with Aston Villa supporters to this day."

Adam Fleet suggests Gerry Armstrong who "left Brighton under something of a cloud, having clambered into the stands during a reserve game and headbutting a fan for making disparaging remarks". Indeed the former Northern Ireland international was charged with GBH after the incident — following the first red card of Armstrong's career – during a Sussex Cup tie in January 1988 that left the spectator, Wayne Marmont, requiring six stitches in a gashed forehead. Armstrong left the club a fortnight later, and after a court appearance was conditionally discharged for a year and ordered to pay £200 compensation and £20 costs.

In March 1994 there was a riotous end to Fisher Athletic's game against Wealdstone, with Fisher's David Ward running the width of the pitch, wading into the crowd and punching a fan who had been barracking him on the side of the head. An FA disciplinary hearing dished out a two-week ban.

Manchester City's Craig Bellamy added his name to this roster of shame on Sunday, after appearing to shove a fan who had run on to the Old Trafford pitch following Michael Owen's late winner for Manchester United and as Mark Hughes (and reader Henry Young) point out Brian Clough cuffed a pitch invader while manager of Nottingham Forest and received a touchline ban for his trouble

Major League Soccer supporters also seem in inflame players' ire. David Beckham confronted Los Angeles Galaxy fans earlier this year, and Clint Mathis was fined $500 for something similar in 2003, though neither could be construed as an outright attack. Unlike the incident in 2001 when Tampa Bay's Mamadou Diallo, MLS's top goalscorer in 2000, lunged toward and threw a punch at a Colorado Rapids fan as he walked off the pitch at full-time following a 2-1 defeat. The Rapids fan, who Diallo accused of racial abuse, apparently held off the attacker with the help of an umbrella and the Senegalese was handed a four-game suspension.


Which players have attacked fans?

Nottingham Forest manager Brian Clough (white collar), grabs a football supporter, one of hundreds who swarmed onto the field after Forest's 5-2 victory over Queens Park Rangers in a Littlewoods Cup quarter-final. One Forest supporter told the Press Association that she saw Clough hit at least four people. Photograph: PA/PA Archive/Press Association Ima

Nottingham Forest manager Brian Clough (white collar), grabs a football supporter, one of hundreds who swarmed onto the field after Forest's 5-2 victory over Queens Park Rangers in a Littlewoods Cup quarter-final. One Forest supporter told the Press Association that she saw Clough hit at least four people. Photograph: PA/PA Archive/Press Association Ima

"I noticed in this weekend's Observer that a Colombian player was sent to prison earlier this year after shooting a fan," wrote Ed McMillan last week. "Other than the obvious Cantona kung-fu kick, are there many other example of players attacking supporters, particularly their own?"

Eric Cantona is by no means alone in his aggressive attitude toward supporters. Javier Flórez was the Colombian midfielder who went too far after losing in a local tournament final earlier this year. The Atletico Junior player shot at a group of supporters, killing one, who chanted "weak, weak, weak" at him as he drove past. Flórez explained he was "drunk and angry" when it happened, following his release from prison on a £45,000 bail.

Somewhat less tragically, Paul Haynes recounts the story of Tom "Pongo" Waring, an Aston Villa striker (in more ways than one) in the 1930s. "The story goes while playing for Aston Villa in a match at Villa Park, Waring had gone to fetch the ball that had gone out of play," he writes. "He then heard someone making an insulting remark, waded into a crowd, punched the offender and then received a round of applause when he returned to the pitch. He was neither sanctioned, sent off, punished by his club/the FA nor was he charged by the police, and remains a legend with Aston Villa supporters to this day."

Adam Fleet suggests Gerry Armstrong who "left Brighton under something of a cloud, having clambered into the stands during a reserve game and headbutting a fan for making disparaging remarks". Indeed the former Northern Ireland international was charged with GBH after the incident — following the first red card of Armstrong's career – during a Sussex Cup tie in January 1988 that left the spectator, Wayne Marmont, requiring six stitches in a gashed forehead. Armstrong left the club a fortnight later, and after a court appearance was conditionally discharged for a year and ordered to pay £200 compensation and £20 costs.

In March 1994 there was a riotous end to Fisher Athletic's game against Wealdstone, with Fisher's David Ward running the width of the pitch, wading into the crowd and punching a fan who had been barracking him on the side of the head. An FA disciplinary hearing dished out a two-week ban.

Manchester City's Craig Bellamy added his name to this roster of shame on Sunday, after appearing to shove a fan who had run on to the Old Trafford pitch following Michael Owen's late winner for Manchester United and as Mark Hughes (and reader Henry Young) point out Brian Clough cuffed a pitch invader while manager of Nottingham Forest and received a touchline ban for his trouble

Major League Soccer supporters also seem in inflame players' ire. David Beckham confronted Los Angeles Galaxy fans earlier this year, and Clint Mathis was fined $500 for something similar in 2003, though neither could be construed as an outright attack. Unlike the incident in 2001 when Tampa Bay's Mamadou Diallo, MLS's top goalscorer in 2000, lunged toward and threw a punch at a Colorado Rapids fan as he walked off the pitch at full-time following a 2-1 defeat. The Rapids fan, who Diallo accused of racial abuse, apparently held off the attacker with the help of an umbrella and the Senegalese was handed a four-game suspension.


Which players have attacked fans?

Nottingham Forest manager Brian Clough (white collar), grabs a football supporter, one of hundreds who swarmed onto the field after Forest's 5-2 victory over Queens Park Rangers in a Littlewoods Cup quarter-final. One Forest supporter told the Press Association that she saw Clough hit at least four people. Photograph: PA/PA Archive/Press Association Ima

Nottingham Forest manager Brian Clough (white collar), grabs a football supporter, one of hundreds who swarmed onto the field after Forest's 5-2 victory over Queens Park Rangers in a Littlewoods Cup quarter-final. One Forest supporter told the Press Association that she saw Clough hit at least four people. Photograph: PA/PA Archive/Press Association Ima

"I noticed in this weekend's Observer that a Colombian player was sent to prison earlier this year after shooting a fan," wrote Ed McMillan last week. "Other than the obvious Cantona kung-fu kick, are there many other example of players attacking supporters, particularly their own?"

Eric Cantona is by no means alone in his aggressive attitude toward supporters. Javier Flórez was the Colombian midfielder who went too far after losing in a local tournament final earlier this year. The Atletico Junior player shot at a group of supporters, killing one, who chanted "weak, weak, weak" at him as he drove past. Flórez explained he was "drunk and angry" when it happened, following his release from prison on a £45,000 bail.

Somewhat less tragically, Paul Haynes recounts the story of Tom "Pongo" Waring, an Aston Villa striker (in more ways than one) in the 1930s. "The story goes while playing for Aston Villa in a match at Villa Park, Waring had gone to fetch the ball that had gone out of play," he writes. "He then heard someone making an insulting remark, waded into a crowd, punched the offender and then received a round of applause when he returned to the pitch. He was neither sanctioned, sent off, punished by his club/the FA nor was he charged by the police, and remains a legend with Aston Villa supporters to this day."

Adam Fleet suggests Gerry Armstrong who "left Brighton under something of a cloud, having clambered into the stands during a reserve game and headbutting a fan for making disparaging remarks". Indeed the former Northern Ireland international was charged with GBH after the incident — following the first red card of Armstrong's career – during a Sussex Cup tie in January 1988 that left the spectator, Wayne Marmont, requiring six stitches in a gashed forehead. Armstrong left the club a fortnight later, and after a court appearance was conditionally discharged for a year and ordered to pay £200 compensation and £20 costs.

In March 1994 there was a riotous end to Fisher Athletic's game against Wealdstone, with Fisher's David Ward running the width of the pitch, wading into the crowd and punching a fan who had been barracking him on the side of the head. An FA disciplinary hearing dished out a two-week ban.

Manchester City's Craig Bellamy added his name to this roster of shame on Sunday, after appearing to shove a fan who had run on to the Old Trafford pitch following Michael Owen's late winner for Manchester United and as Mark Hughes (and reader Henry Young) point out Brian Clough cuffed a pitch invader while manager of Nottingham Forest and received a touchline ban for his trouble

Major League Soccer supporters also seem in inflame players' ire. David Beckham confronted Los Angeles Galaxy fans earlier this year, and Clint Mathis was fined $500 for something similar in 2003, though neither could be construed as an outright attack. Unlike the incident in 2001 when Tampa Bay's Mamadou Diallo, MLS's top goalscorer in 2000, lunged toward and threw a punch at a Colorado Rapids fan as he walked off the pitch at full-time following a 2-1 defeat. The Rapids fan, who Diallo accused of racial abuse, apparently held off the attacker with the help of an umbrella and the Senegalese was handed a four-game suspension.


Which players have attacked fans?

Nottingham Forest manager Brian Clough (white collar), grabs a football supporter, one of hundreds who swarmed onto the field after Forest's 5-2 victory over Queens Park Rangers in a Littlewoods Cup quarter-final. One Forest supporter told the Press Association that she saw Clough hit at least four people. Photograph: PA/PA Archive/Press Association Ima

Nottingham Forest manager Brian Clough (white collar), grabs a football supporter, one of hundreds who swarmed onto the field after Forest's 5-2 victory over Queens Park Rangers in a Littlewoods Cup quarter-final. One Forest supporter told the Press Association that she saw Clough hit at least four people. Photograph: PA/PA Archive/Press Association Ima

"I noticed in this weekend's Observer that a Colombian player was sent to prison earlier this year after shooting a fan," wrote Ed McMillan last week. "Other than the obvious Cantona kung-fu kick, are there many other example of players attacking supporters, particularly their own?"

Eric Cantona is by no means alone in his aggressive attitude toward supporters. Javier Flórez was the Colombian midfielder who went too far after losing in a local tournament final earlier this year. The Atletico Junior player shot at a group of supporters, killing one, who chanted "weak, weak, weak" at him as he drove past. Flórez explained he was "drunk and angry" when it happened, following his release from prison on a £45,000 bail.

Somewhat less tragically, Paul Haynes recounts the story of Tom "Pongo" Waring, an Aston Villa striker (in more ways than one) in the 1930s. "The story goes while playing for Aston Villa in a match at Villa Park, Waring had gone to fetch the ball that had gone out of play," he writes. "He then heard someone making an insulting remark, waded into a crowd, punched the offender and then received a round of applause when he returned to the pitch. He was neither sanctioned, sent off, punished by his club/the FA nor was he charged by the police, and remains a legend with Aston Villa supporters to this day."

Adam Fleet suggests Gerry Armstrong who "left Brighton under something of a cloud, having clambered into the stands during a reserve game and headbutting a fan for making disparaging remarks". Indeed the former Northern Ireland international was charged with GBH after the incident — following the first red card of Armstrong's career – during a Sussex Cup tie in January 1988 that left the spectator, Wayne Marmont, requiring six stitches in a gashed forehead. Armstrong left the club a fortnight later, and after a court appearance was conditionally discharged for a year and ordered to pay £200 compensation and £20 costs.

In March 1994 there was a riotous end to Fisher Athletic's game against Wealdstone, with Fisher's David Ward running the width of the pitch, wading into the crowd and punching a fan who had been barracking him on the side of the head. An FA disciplinary hearing dished out a two-week ban.

Manchester City's Craig Bellamy added his name to this roster of shame on Sunday, after appearing to shove a fan who had run on to the Old Trafford pitch following Michael Owen's late winner for Manchester United and as Mark Hughes (and reader Henry Young) point out Brian Clough cuffed a pitch invader while manager of Nottingham Forest and received a touchline ban for his trouble

Major League Soccer supporters also seem in inflame players' ire. David Beckham confronted Los Angeles Galaxy fans earlier this year, and Clint Mathis was fined $500 for something similar in 2003, though neither could be construed as an outright attack. Unlike the incident in 2001 when Tampa Bay's Mamadou Diallo, MLS's top goalscorer in 2000, lunged toward and threw a punch at a Colorado Rapids fan as he walked off the pitch at full-time following a 2-1 defeat. The Rapids fan, who Diallo accused of racial abuse, apparently held off the attacker with the help of an umbrella and the Senegalese was handed a four-game suspension.


Which players have attacked fans?

Nottingham Forest manager Brian Clough (white collar), grabs a football supporter, one of hundreds who swarmed onto the field after Forest's 5-2 victory over Queens Park Rangers in a Littlewoods Cup quarter-final. One Forest supporter told the Press Association that she saw Clough hit at least four people. Photograph: PA/PA Archive/Press Association Ima

Nottingham Forest manager Brian Clough (white collar), grabs a football supporter, one of hundreds who swarmed onto the field after Forest's 5-2 victory over Queens Park Rangers in a Littlewoods Cup quarter-final. One Forest supporter told the Press Association that she saw Clough hit at least four people. Photograph: PA/PA Archive/Press Association Ima

"I noticed in this weekend's Observer that a Colombian player was sent to prison earlier this year after shooting a fan," wrote Ed McMillan last week. "Other than the obvious Cantona kung-fu kick, are there many other example of players attacking supporters, particularly their own?"

Eric Cantona is by no means alone in his aggressive attitude toward supporters. Javier Flórez was the Colombian midfielder who went too far after losing in a local tournament final earlier this year. The Atletico Junior player shot at a group of supporters, killing one, who chanted "weak, weak, weak" at him as he drove past. Flórez explained he was "drunk and angry" when it happened, following his release from prison on a £45,000 bail.

Somewhat less tragically, Paul Haynes recounts the story of Tom "Pongo" Waring, an Aston Villa striker (in more ways than one) in the 1930s. "The story goes while playing for Aston Villa in a match at Villa Park, Waring had gone to fetch the ball that had gone out of play," he writes. "He then heard someone making an insulting remark, waded into a crowd, punched the offender and then received a round of applause when he returned to the pitch. He was neither sanctioned, sent off, punished by his club/the FA nor was he charged by the police, and remains a legend with Aston Villa supporters to this day."

Adam Fleet suggests Gerry Armstrong who "left Brighton under something of a cloud, having clambered into the stands during a reserve game and headbutting a fan for making disparaging remarks". Indeed the former Northern Ireland international was charged with GBH after the incident — following the first red card of Armstrong's career – during a Sussex Cup tie in January 1988 that left the spectator, Wayne Marmont, requiring six stitches in a gashed forehead. Armstrong left the club a fortnight later, and after a court appearance was conditionally discharged for a year and ordered to pay £200 compensation and £20 costs.

In March 1994 there was a riotous end to Fisher Athletic's game against Wealdstone, with Fisher's David Ward running the width of the pitch, wading into the crowd and punching a fan who had been barracking him on the side of the head. An FA disciplinary hearing dished out a two-week ban.

Manchester City's Craig Bellamy added his name to this roster of shame on Sunday, after appearing to shove a fan who had run on to the Old Trafford pitch following Michael Owen's late winner for Manchester United and as Mark Hughes (and reader Henry Young) point out Brian Clough cuffed a pitch invader while manager of Nottingham Forest and received a touchline ban for his trouble

Major League Soccer supporters also seem in inflame players' ire. David Beckham confronted Los Angeles Galaxy fans earlier this year, and Clint Mathis was fined $500 for something similar in 2003, though neither could be construed as an outright attack. Unlike the incident in 2001 when Tampa Bay's Mamadou Diallo, MLS's top goalscorer in 2000, lunged toward and threw a punch at a Colorado Rapids fan as he walked off the pitch at full-time following a 2-1 defeat. The Rapids fan, who Diallo accused of racial abuse, apparently held off the attacker with the help of an umbrella and the Senegalese was handed a four-game suspension.


Which players have attacked fans?

Nottingham Forest manager Brian Clough (white collar), grabs a football supporter, one of hundreds who swarmed onto the field after Forest's 5-2 victory over Queens Park Rangers in a Littlewoods Cup quarter-final. One Forest supporter told the Press Association that she saw Clough hit at least four people. Photograph: PA/PA Archive/Press Association Ima

Nottingham Forest manager Brian Clough (white collar), grabs a football supporter, one of hundreds who swarmed onto the field after Forest's 5-2 victory over Queens Park Rangers in a Littlewoods Cup quarter-final. One Forest supporter told the Press Association that she saw Clough hit at least four people. Photograph: PA/PA Archive/Press Association Ima

"I noticed in this weekend's Observer that a Colombian player was sent to prison earlier this year after shooting a fan," wrote Ed McMillan last week. "Other than the obvious Cantona kung-fu kick, are there many other example of players attacking supporters, particularly their own?"

Eric Cantona is by no means alone in his aggressive attitude toward supporters. Javier Flórez was the Colombian midfielder who went too far after losing in a local tournament final earlier this year. The Atletico Junior player shot at a group of supporters, killing one, who chanted "weak, weak, weak" at him as he drove past. Flórez explained he was "drunk and angry" when it happened, following his release from prison on a £45,000 bail.

Somewhat less tragically, Paul Haynes recounts the story of Tom "Pongo" Waring, an Aston Villa striker (in more ways than one) in the 1930s. "The story goes while playing for Aston Villa in a match at Villa Park, Waring had gone to fetch the ball that had gone out of play," he writes. "He then heard someone making an insulting remark, waded into a crowd, punched the offender and then received a round of applause when he returned to the pitch. He was neither sanctioned, sent off, punished by his club/the FA nor was he charged by the police, and remains a legend with Aston Villa supporters to this day."

Adam Fleet suggests Gerry Armstrong who "left Brighton under something of a cloud, having clambered into the stands during a reserve game and headbutting a fan for making disparaging remarks". Indeed the former Northern Ireland international was charged with GBH after the incident — following the first red card of Armstrong's career – during a Sussex Cup tie in January 1988 that left the spectator, Wayne Marmont, requiring six stitches in a gashed forehead. Armstrong left the club a fortnight later, and after a court appearance was conditionally discharged for a year and ordered to pay £200 compensation and £20 costs.

In March 1994 there was a riotous end to Fisher Athletic's game against Wealdstone, with Fisher's David Ward running the width of the pitch, wading into the crowd and punching a fan who had been barracking him on the side of the head. An FA disciplinary hearing dished out a two-week ban.

Manchester City's Craig Bellamy added his name to this roster of shame on Sunday, after appearing to shove a fan who had run on to the Old Trafford pitch following Michael Owen's late winner for Manchester United and as Mark Hughes (and reader Henry Young) point out Brian Clough cuffed a pitch invader while manager of Nottingham Forest and received a touchline ban for his trouble

Major League Soccer supporters also seem in inflame players' ire. David Beckham confronted Los Angeles Galaxy fans earlier this year, and Clint Mathis was fined $500 for something similar in 2003, though neither could be construed as an outright attack. Unlike the incident in 2001 when Tampa Bay's Mamadou Diallo, MLS's top goalscorer in 2000, lunged toward and threw a punch at a Colorado Rapids fan as he walked off the pitch at full-time following a 2-1 defeat. The Rapids fan, who Diallo accused of racial abuse, apparently held off the attacker with the help of an umbrella and the Senegalese was handed a four-game suspension.


Which players have attacked fans?

Nottingham Forest manager Brian Clough (white collar), grabs a football supporter, one of hundreds who swarmed onto the field after Forest's 5-2 victory over Queens Park Rangers in a Littlewoods Cup quarter-final. One Forest supporter told the Press Association that she saw Clough hit at least four people. Photograph: PA/PA Archive/Press Association Ima

Nottingham Forest manager Brian Clough (white collar), grabs a football supporter, one of hundreds who swarmed onto the field after Forest's 5-2 victory over Queens Park Rangers in a Littlewoods Cup quarter-final. One Forest supporter told the Press Association that she saw Clough hit at least four people. Photograph: PA/PA Archive/Press Association Ima

"I noticed in this weekend's Observer that a Colombian player was sent to prison earlier this year after shooting a fan," wrote Ed McMillan last week. "Other than the obvious Cantona kung-fu kick, are there many other example of players attacking supporters, particularly their own?"

Eric Cantona is by no means alone in his aggressive attitude toward supporters. Javier Flórez was the Colombian midfielder who went too far after losing in a local tournament final earlier this year. The Atletico Junior player shot at a group of supporters, killing one, who chanted "weak, weak, weak" at him as he drove past. Flórez explained he was "drunk and angry" when it happened, following his release from prison on a £45,000 bail.

Somewhat less tragically, Paul Haynes recounts the story of Tom "Pongo" Waring, an Aston Villa striker (in more ways than one) in the 1930s. "The story goes while playing for Aston Villa in a match at Villa Park, Waring had gone to fetch the ball that had gone out of play," he writes. "He then heard someone making an insulting remark, waded into a crowd, punched the offender and then received a round of applause when he returned to the pitch. He was neither sanctioned, sent off, punished by his club/the FA nor was he charged by the police, and remains a legend with Aston Villa supporters to this day."

Adam Fleet suggests Gerry Armstrong who "left Brighton under something of a cloud, having clambered into the stands during a reserve game and headbutting a fan for making disparaging remarks". Indeed the former Northern Ireland international was charged with GBH after the incident — following the first red card of Armstrong's career – during a Sussex Cup tie in January 1988 that left the spectator, Wayne Marmont, requiring six stitches in a gashed forehead. Armstrong left the club a fortnight later, and after a court appearance was conditionally discharged for a year and ordered to pay £200 compensation and £20 costs.

In March 1994 there was a riotous end to Fisher Athletic's game against Wealdstone, with Fisher's David Ward running the width of the pitch, wading into the crowd and punching a fan who had been barracking him on the side of the head. An FA disciplinary hearing dished out a two-week ban.

Manchester City's Craig Bellamy added his name to this roster of shame on Sunday, after appearing to shove a fan who had run on to the Old Trafford pitch following Michael Owen's late winner for Manchester United and as Mark Hughes (and reader Henry Young) point out Brian Clough cuffed a pitch invader while manager of Nottingham Forest and received a touchline ban for his trouble

Major League Soccer supporters also seem in inflame players' ire. David Beckham confronted Los Angeles Galaxy fans earlier this year, and Clint Mathis was fined $500 for something similar in 2003, though neither could be construed as an outright attack. Unlike the incident in 2001 when Tampa Bay's Mamadou Diallo, MLS's top goalscorer in 2000, lunged toward and threw a punch at a Colorado Rapids fan as he walked off the pitch at full-time following a 2-1 defeat. The Rapids fan, who Diallo accused of racial abuse, apparently held off the attacker with the help of an umbrella and the Senegalese was handed a four-game suspension.


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